U.S. Winter Wheat Condition the Worst in 16 Years

30 Percent of Acres in Poor or Very Poor Condition

Market Intel / April 3, 2018

Following an extensive drought across much of the Southwest, winter wheat acres in good-to-excellent conditions are the lowest in 16 years. USDA’s April 2, 2018, Crop Progress report revealed the percentage of U.S. winter wheat acres in good-to-excellent condition at 32 percent, down from 51 percent at the same time last year, and the lowest rating since the 2002 marketing year.

As of April 1, 2018, 38 percent of winter wheat acres are in fair condition, up from 35 percent last year. Finally, 30 percent of winter wheat acres are in poor or very poor condition, up from 14 percent in the same week a year ago.

For 2018, U.S. growers planted 32.7 million acres of winter wheat. Of those acres, approximately 9.9 million acres are in poor or very poor condition. States with the most acres in poor or very poor condition include Kansas (47 percent), Texas (59 percent) and Oklahoma (46 percent).

Contact:
John Newton, Ph.D.
Chief Economist
(202) 406-3729
jnewton@fb.org
 

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