Time for Turkey Trivia

Viewpoints / Focus on Agriculture November 16, 2017

Credit: Sarah Lowgren / CC BY 2.0 

By Cyndie Shearing

Looking for some interesting, lesser-known facts related to Thanksgiving? Check out the turkey trivia below.

Beard – black lock of hair found on the chest of male turkeys

Flock – large group of turkeys

Hen – female turkey

North Carolina, Minnesota and Indiana – top three states for turkey production

Poult – baby turkey

Snood – long, red, fleshy growth that hangs down over the beak

Tom – male turkey

Wattle – bright red appendage on the neck

28 days – time it takes a turkey egg to hatch

$49.12 – total average cost for a classic Thanksgiving Dinner for 10 people (less than $5 per person) including a 16-pound turkey, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation

Speaking of trivia, the folks at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line started a petition proposing a Thanksgiving turkey emoji to Unicode, the non-profit organization that oversees the coding standards for texting and emoji.

According to Thanksgiving turkey emoji supporters, “Every other major holiday has at least one emoji. There’s fireworks, champagne and noise-makers for New Year’s Eve; cupid hearts for Valentine’s Day; ghosts and jack-o-lanterns for Halloween and so much more. But Thanksgiving, the most-celebrated holiday in the country, doesn’t have an emoji that truly captures the occasion.”

Get more fun facts and trivia about farming and agriculture by ordering a Food and Farm Facts trivia card set for $10 online. With more than 250 questions on 46 playing cards, the set brings a popular game element to important national agricultural statistics. In a classroom or living room, the cards test players’ knowledge about agricultural production, sustainability and nutrition. Cards are aligned to the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture’s 2017 Food and Farm Facts book.

Cyndie Shearing
Director, Communications

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