Impact of COVID-19 on Agriculture

Women in Agriculture Survey 2019

Market Intel / October 31, 2019

The American Farm Bureau Women’s Leadership Committee releases the results of its second Women in Ag Survey today. The aim of the survey is to accurately gauge not only the achievements of women in agriculture, but also their goals and aspirations, to begin the conversation about their specific needs.

The results are based on an online survey disseminated throughout Farm Bureau’s communication channels between March 17, 2019, and June 21, 2019. The 23-question survey received 3,000 responses from 49 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. The robust response led to a nationally representative report focusing on demographics, as well as women’s experiences and opinions on leadership, involvement in ag organizations, advocacy, business development and farm policy.

Highlights

According to USDA’s 2017 Census of Agriculture, women now make up 36% of the total population of U.S. farmers. This growing base of women in agriculture is an active and highly mobilized group of individuals. Of Farm Bureau members surveyed, 75% are leaders at the local government level with 45% serving as a board member or officer. The survey also indicates that 95% of respondents actively advocate for agriculture. However, the report also indicates that 91% of those surveyed believe there should be more women in leadership roles in the agriculture industry – a statistic that has remained relatively unchanged from the 2015 survey.

Download the entire report here.

Expand Image

Contact:
Megan Nelson
Economic Analyst
(202) 406-3629
megann@fb.org
twitter.com/@MeganRNelson1
 

Share This Article

Credit: iStockPhoto 

New-crop sales of soybeans, corn, sorghum and cotton to China have been getting a lot of attention. These purchases are being closely watched and interpreted as potential signs as to whether China will be fulfilling their Phase 1 commitments, which were finalized in January 2020. Data from USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service’s U.S. Export Sales Report, released on August 13 and covering sales through August 6, back up the rumors of large sales. However, how do new-crop sales compare to previous years? To find out, we compare new-crop sales (2020/21 marketing year) to the similar week from the last five years.

Full Article
Credit: fdecomite CC BY 2.0 

On the back of COVID-19-related price shocks and a record-high cheese price, the July Class I milk price was nearly $2.60 per hundredweight, or 13%, below where it would have been prior to a 2018 farm bill change, spurring the withholding of 8-plus billion pounds of milk over two months, a 32% reduction from the prior year, from Federal Milk Marketing Order revenue sharing pools across the county. As a result, FMMO revenue sharing pools were short $527 million in June and $667 million in July, for a combined $1.2 billion. This shortfall caused record-low FMMO minimum milk prices across the U.S. that showed up in dairy farmers’ milk checks as negative producer price differentials The PPD in California, for example, amounted to nearly -$10 per hundredweight for July. Put simply, most dairy farmers are not happy. To make matters worse, public and private risk management tools were unable to protect against these record-large milk check deductions.

Full Article