Impact of COVID-19 on Agriculture

Rural Resilience Training Program Addresses Farm and Ranch Stress

News / FBNews March 17, 2020

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As people around the country look for big and small ways to help their neighbors through the uncertainty that has come with COVID-19, the Rural Resilience Training Program, now available at no cost for all Farm Bureau members and staff, is a chance to do just that.  

Developed by Michigan State University Extension in partnership with the American Farm Bureau Federation, National Farmers Union and Farm Credit, the online training program is designed for individuals who interact with farmers and ranchers to help recognize signs of stress and offer resources.

“This free training comes at the perfect time and provides Farm Bureau staff and members a meaningful way to make a difference in their communities,” said RJ Karney, AFBF director of congressional relations.                                                                                         

The program will give participants the skills to understand the sources of stress, learn the warning signs of stress and suicide, identify effective communication strategies, reduce stigma related to mental health concerns and connect farmers and ranchers with appropriate mental health and other resources. The training takes about 4-5 hours to complete and can be done over multiple sessions.

“Yes, it is a time investment, but one that pays vast dividends for both participants and those they will help,” Karney said.

State and county Farm Bureau staff and members can register for the online training here

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