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The 2017 NAFTA Medal Count

Market Intel / February 15, 2018

Credit: CC0 1.0 

Every two years the world gathers to watch athletes perform amazing feats. In the spirit of the 2018 Olympic Winter Games and recently released trade data by USDA, we present the medal count of Mexico and Canada as it relates to U.S. agricultural exports. By that we mean, for how many product categories were Mexico and Canada our top export destination (gold), second largest market (silver) and third largest market (bronze) in the 2017 calendar year.

The results are impressive. Mexico led the overall medal count with 32, which was comprised of 9 golds, 17 silvers and 6 bronzes. Canada was right on Mexico’s heels with an impressive 28 medals overall, and several more golds. Canada finished 2017 with 20 golds, 6 silvers and 2 bronzes. It is impressive showings like this that once again lead Canada and Mexico to be our largest and third largest markets, respectively, in 2017. Exports to our NAFTA partners topped $39.1 billion in 2017, nearly $1 billion higher than 2016. Now, here are the individual commodity results.

   Credit: Pyfisch/(CC BY-SA 2.5)   
   Credit: Sarang/(CC BY-SA 2.5)   
   Credit: Sarang/(CC BY-SA 2.5)   

Contact:
Veronica Nigh
Economist
(202) 406-3622
veronican@fb.org
 

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Credit: United Soybean Board / CC BY 2.0 

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